Skip to main content

Wave of strikes hits Syria's last rebel-held bastion




Dozens of air strikes and shelling hit parts of the last swathe of Syrian territory still held by rebels on Friday, according to rebels, rescue workers and a war monitoring group, in a possible prelude to a full-scale government offensive.

The UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said dozens of strikes from helicopters and war planes had hit parts of Hama, Idlib and Aleppo provinces, killing at least 29 people.

The three areas in northwest Syria are the last major ones still in the hands of fighters seeking to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad, whose forces recaptured the area around Damascus and the southwest earlier this year.

Abu al-Baraa al-Hamawi, a rebel leader in northern Hama, said a “massacre” had resulted from strikes in western Aleppo on the town of Urem al-Kubra. Pro-opposition television Orient News said at least 20 people were killed there and the Observatory said at least 18 had died.

On Thursday the Syrian army had dropped leaflets over Idlib province, urging people to agree to a return of state rule and telling them the seven-year war was nearing its end.

Al-Hamawi said Friday’s attacks - the heaviest in months - appeared part of a “psychological media war against the people”.

Rebels were “ready to repel any possible attack by regime forces. 

They will be taught a lesson they won’t forget: Idlib is different to other regions,” he added.

Mohammed Rasheed, a spokesman for the Jaish al-Nasr rebel group based in Hama province, said pro-Syrian government forces had not yet advanced on the ground and the attacks consisted of shelling and air bombardment.

The Syrian White Helmets, a group of rescue workers established in rebel-held areas of the country, said on Twitter that barrel bombs had also been used.

Syrian state news agency SANA reported that the Syrian army carried out operations against “terrorist groups”, its term for the rebels, in northern Hama countryside, destroying several of their headquarters and killing and wounding an unspecified number.


NEXT TARGET?

Hundreds of thousands of Assad opponents have relocated to northwest Syria under evacuation agreements reached as other parts of the country fell to pro-government forces backed by Russia and Iran.

Assad has indicated the area, which borders Turkey, could be his next target

The Observatory said Friday’s air strikes were the first to hit the area in almost a month and could be seen as “preparation for an offensive”. 

It has said additional government forces have been arriving this week for a possible attack in an area to the southwest of the opposition territory.

The United Nations worries that such an offensive could force 2.5 million people toward the Turkish border.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Armenian protesters block traffic, railways & airport as protest leader loses PM bid

Anti-government protesters disrupted traffic in Armenia’s capital, blocking railways and roads leading to Yerevan International Airport, after the parliament voted against opposition leader Nikol Pashinyan’s bid for interim PM.
Protesters managed to block streets connecting downtown Yerevan to residential districts, disrupting transportation in Armenia’s capital, footage from the scene shows. 
Yerevan’s metro system has also been paralyzed as demonstrators sit on the tracks, preventing trains from passing.
Meanwhile, protesters disrupted traffic on a road leading to Yerevan’s Zvartnots International Airport, located just 12km from the center of the city. 
Consequently, some passengers had to go the rest of the way on foot in order to catch their flights, according to Sputnik news agency.
Railway services have also been disrupted all across the country amid the demonstrations, a spokesman for South Caucasus Railways confirmed to Interfax. 
Some other highways, including the one connecting th…

Strange phenomenon under Africa threatens to flip Earth’s magnetic field

Earth’s magnetic field is decaying at such a rapid rate that scientists think the poles may flip. 
New research shows the most significant weakening is happening under Africa, in an area called the ‘South Atlantic Anomaly.’
As well as giving us our north and south poles, the magnetic field blankets the Earth, protecting it from solar winds and cosmic radiation. 
Without it there would likely be no life on our planet today. 
However, the forcefield has weakened significantly in the past 160 years and scientists have suggested that it could be in the process of flipping. 
Effectively this means a switch in magnetic polarity and would see compasses point south instead of north.
Strangely, this has actually happened several times in the history of the planet, occurring roughly every 200,000 to 300,000 years. 
Approximately 40,000 years ago, it attempted to switch before snapping back into place. 
This NASA illustration captures the enormous disruption to the fields during a reversal:




The birthplac…

Professor Stephen Hawking Says Knows What Existed Before The Big Bang

According to the latest comments made by Professor Stephen Hawking, Before the Big Bang, time existed in a bent state that was distorted along another dimension.
The famous theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has an answer to the enigma of what existed before the Big Bang, the beginning of the Universe, 13,800 million years ago.
In an interview with his colleague Neil deGrasse Tyson in the TV show ‘Star Talk‘ broadcasted on the National Geographic Channel, Hawking explained what existed before the universe.
“The boundary condition of the universe…is that it has no boundary,” Hawking said.
According to this theory, the history of the universe is not a flat line but a four-dimensional, curved object, “just as the surface of the Earth, but with two more dimensions,” Hawking said. 
As explained by Professor Hawking, the Big Bang was practically the formation as we today understand as ‘time,’ since this event, 13,800 million years ago, broke the known laws of physics. 
It also means that anyth…