Over 60% of Brexit Advocates View Damage to Economy Reasonable Price



A YouGov poll showed that over 60 percent of UK voters who had supported the Leave option for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union at the 2016 referendum are committed to their choices.

Over 60 percent of UK voters who had supported the Leave option for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union at the 2016 referendum are committed to their choices at such extent that they consider economic consequences a price worth paying to get their way on the issue, a YouGov poll showed Tuesday.

"Fully 61% of Leave voters say that they think that ‘significant damage to the British economy to be a price worth paying for bringing Britain out of the European Union.’ 

Only one in five Leave voters (20%) are clear that such a price is too high for Brexit – the remaining 19% don’t know," the statement summarizing the poll results read.

When asked about the more personal consequences for Brexit, 39 percent of the Leave voters said the loss of their own job or that of a family member would be a price worth paying for, while 38 percent said it would not and 34 percent did not know.

The research also showed that the more older Leave voters supported the statement that economic consequences of Brexit worth the United Kingdom’s removal from the European Union.

"Whereas 46% of 18-24 year old Leave voters say significant damage to the economy is a price worth paying for Brexit, this figure increases with every subsequent age group to 71% of 65+ year old Leave voters. 

Likewise, when the cost of Brexit would be themselves or members of their family losing their job, the proportion willing to pay that price rose each age group from 25% of 18-24 year old Leave voters to 50% of 65+ year old Leave voters," the statement further read.

As for the voters from the Remain camp who had voted against Brexit, 34 percent of them said that "significant damage to the UK economy would be a price worth paying if it meant that the United Kingdom stayed in the European Union." 

However, 38 percent of the Remain voters said that averting Brexit at such a cost was too high while the remaining 27 percent said they did not know.

"If it cost themselves or members of their family their job, close to one in five Remain voters (18%) believe that would be a price worth paying to remain in the European Union – 61% do not," the statement added.

The document noted that one in five Remain voters said they would consider "significant damage to the British economy after leaving the European Union to be a price worth paying to teach Leave politicians and Leave voters a lesson." 

Sixty-four percent of the Remain respondents disapproved of the statement while 18 percent said they did not know.

The referendum on the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union took place on June 23, 2016. 

The vote resulted in 51.89 percent of people voting for the United Kingdom to exit the block while 48.11 percent of the voters supported the Remain option.

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